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Dynamometer and 5 Gas Emissions Analyzer

Emissions

 

        We have always wanted to have access to a dynamometer and a 5 gas exhaust emissions analyzer to be able to further document the benefits of the Hydrogen Boost system.  Today we can report that we now own our very own dynamometer and emissions analyzer and to sum up preliminary tests we can confirm that what we have been claiming for years had indeed been accurate.  Here’s the story.

 

          A few weeks ago I saw a dynamometer on EBAY with a bid having already met the reserve bid for the auction.  The listing also indicated that the seller had available a 5 gas emissions analyzer for sale.  I contacted the seller and purchased the analyzer for a fair price and bid on the dynamometer a couple times and ended up winning the auction.

 

This week the pair of instruments were delivered in the midst of two weeks of near steady rain up hear in the Northeast that caused much flooding.  With all the rain I didn’t get much time to set up and do extensive testing, but I did get a couple breaks in the rain to do some short preliminary testing. 

 

First I tried out the gas analyzer on the Saturn SL1 at idle, 2000RPM and 2300RPM with no load.  I know the analyzer has not been calibrated in a few years so the numbers will not be accurate but the comparisons between the emissions with and without the Hydrogen Boost system will be relative.  I tested at idle a number of times and consistently got very similar emissions with and without Hydrogen Boost.  I do have to mention that this engine has had Hydrogen Boost installed for quite some time now and it has had a chance to clean out the carbon in the combustion chambers so this car will typically run cleaner than normal even when we shut off the Hydrogen Boost system.  The tests showed varied results when comparing the carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbons (HC), and nitrogen oxides (NOx).  Sometimes the emissions would be slightly higher and sometimes slightly lower when comparing the readings with and without Hydrogen Boost but overall the average readings were virtually indistinguishable.

 

Then I tested at 2000 RPM and 2300 RPM and found slightly better results.  Again the test showed varied results but generally lower emissions with Hydrogen Boost than without.  The NOx emissions were of particular concern to me because we had never tested NOx with Hydrogen Boost and we already had documentation of improvements in CO and HC.  According to automotive engineering theories if the fuel ratio is leaner than 14.7 to 1 the NOx emissions will increase because of higher combustion temperatures.  But in these tests I confirmed what I said in our June 2004 newsletter.  With proper adjustment of the fuel ratio, the NOx emission were indeed lower with Hydrogen Boost than without.

 

Further in depth testing is planned with the engine under load as soon as the rain stops.

 

Dynamometer

 

        Between rain showers I got a chance to set up and test for a couple hours on the dynamometer.  Testing our Saturn SL1 with Hydrogen Boost and without (shutting off the components we could) we confirmed that our system, even without the implementation of driving tips, gives a considerable increase in mileage.  The only test I had a chance to do was at 45 mph with slightly less than normal engine load than when we are cruising down our test track road.  The reason I say slightly less drag is because the mileage figures were slightly higher than on the road.

 

          Without the Hydrogen Boost system turned off (of course we could not take away the engine treatment which was already a part of the engine) the trip MPG for one mile of constant 45 mph on the dynamometer produced a trip mpg reading of 58.5 mpg.  If you are familiar with last month’s newsletter the relatively stock Saturn SL1 was tested to achieve 50 mpg on our ½ mile test track road at the same constant speed.  On the dynamometer, with Hydrogen Boost turned on, the Saturn achieved a trip mpg reading of 69.1 mpg on a one mile run.  This is only an 18% increase over the 58.5 mpg, compared to the 20% increase with Hydrogen Boost on our test track road.  I would expect this slightly lower improvement because of the reduced load on the engine. 

 

Remember that at 70 mph on the road the Saturn achieved a 25% increase in mileage with Hydrogen Boost.  I expect to come close to duplicating the 25% increase on the dynamometer when we get the engine load and tire speed up to comparable conditions to 70 mph cruise.  Hydrogen Boost has greater improvements at higher engine loads because the effects of the components is more pronounced when more combustion is taking place.

 

If the rain ever stops I hope to get some serious testing done before winter, that is if I don’t have to go to Italy on my other Hydrogen Boosting project. 

 

10-17-05 Update

 

          Today I kept my promise to do further testing on the Dynamometer with the Saturn SL1.  Since the engine was cold I decided to start off with mileage tests with a cold engine during warm-up to show how much difference engine temperature matters.  I shut off what system components that I could but I left the tires inflated to Hydrogen Boost standards and of course the engine treatment could not be removed. 

 

          The first one mile test at 45 mph achieved a mileage of 58.0 mpg with engine coolant temperature at 145 degrees.  This was followed by 60 mpg at 165 degrees, 61.0 mpg at 175 degrees, and 62.0 at 185 degrees.  Since 185 degrees is the thermostat setting on the Saturn we could use 62.0 mpg as baseline mileage for the Saturn equipped with XCEL PLUS engine treatment and increased tire pressure.  Last week’s baseline of 58.5 mpg with normal tire pressure likely indicates a 56 mpg true baseline figure for this vehicle without XCEL PLUS engine treatment. 

 

          After the baseline was established I recorded numerous trials (usually five) with the Saturn on the dynamometer equipped in various configurations.  The highest and lowest figures were discarded and the remaining figures were averaged.  Following are the results:

 

Baseline                                    56.0           Increase based on       Increase

                                                             58.5mpg w/XCEL PLUS    overall

Engine cold w/ tire pressure       58                         

XCEL PLUS and tire pressure       62                       6%                   10.7%

Above plus Fuel heater               67.7                  15.7%                20.8%

Above plus Hydrogen                  68.8                  17.6%                22.9%

Above plus electronic circuit       71.6                  22.4%                27.9%

 

Conclusions:  The dynamometer tests were consistent with the road tests already published.  Though these mileage figures are not true road miles per gallon expectations, they use the dynamometer to prevent any implementation of driving tips in influencing the results.  The consistency with the published road test results shows that the road tests were indeed accurate.  I would tend to argue that the road tests were more accurate because they were done under the influence of wind resistance.  Though the wind resistance would have been constant with all these tests because they were all done at the same speed I will agree that the dynamometer is a valuable tool to verify what was already known and published.  And considering that many people will not believe road mileage tests, for good reason considering many claims on the Internet that are not based on controlled experimental data, these dynamometer test results should silence the nay sayers.

 

10-20-05 Update

 

          After finally learning how to change the load on the dynamometer and also how to drive off the thing properly without ripping off my front bumper cover, I set out to do some tests at 70 mpg, with and without the Hydrogen Boost system components turned on.  This time I tested with Hydrogen Boost standard tire pressure (50 psi), starting again with the system shut off and turning on one component at a time until the system was complete.  Then I tested a few different electronic control settings to find the best setting for mileage.  I previously considered the best setting for power to be the best setting for mileage, but today I found out otherwise.  Today’s tests were done slightly different than Monday’s.  Instead of doing five runs of one mile each and averaging the middle three (throwing out the highest and lowest numbers), I became quite consistent on repeating similar numbers so I limited my trials to three runs of one mile each and averaged all three.  For a baseline I had to calculate a soft tire baseline by assuming the increased tire pressure alone would make the same 10.6% increase it did on Monday.  The reason I did this is because when I got the car up onto the dyno and the tire pressure set at 30 psi, the frame of the car was resting on the frame of the dyno.  So the weight of the vehicle was not resting well on the tires when the pressure was 30 psi.  The 10.6% adjustment to the baseline figure below allows us to calculate the benefits of the whole system.  The middle column below indicates the mileage improvement over the 50 psi tires. 

 

Following are the results:

 

Components operating      Mileage        Increase        Increase based on 30 psi tires

Baseline (calculated)         44.3                               

XCEL PLUS and 50 psi        49                                          10.6%

Above plus fuel heater      49.4                0.8%                  11.5%

Above plus Hydrogen         50.0               2.0%                  12.9%

Above plus EC set at 13.5  53.0                8.2%                  19.6%

          EC set at 13.0         55.1               12.4%                 24.4%

          EC set at 12.5         58.2               18.8%                 31.4%

 

After getting test results with the whole system operating I shut off each component individually in reverse order and tested with each configuration again.  The results of these tests were again very similar to the results above.  I did these tests because I suspected that the earlier tests might show improvement in mileage that could be attributed to the vaporizing of fuel in the tank more toward the end than at the beginning, because over time the fuel in the tank increases in temperature.  The second set of tests confirmed that this was NOT the case, and that the mileage gains attributed to each system component was accurate. 

 

Conclusions:          As expected and as predicted above, the improvements in mileage due to the Hydrogen Boost system was more pronounced at higher engine loads, which is what you have at 70 mph versus 45 mph.  In this set of tests, the increase in mileage due to the three engine-related components able to be shut off (fuel heat, hydrogen and EC) was 18.8% versus only 15.5% at 45 mph.  And the total increase in mileage due to the entire system, including increased tire pressure, was 31.4% versus 22.4% with the same configuration at 45 mph.  This should give hope to those of you that drive heavy work vehicles with high engine loads.

 

 

 

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