Home     Specifications     Test Results     Diesel     FAQ     Newsletter     Order     Contact

 

Home

 

Specifications    

 

Test Results

 

Technical Information

 

Testimonial Video

 

Demo Video

 

Newsletter    

 

Order    

 

Contact

 

 

 

 

Following is my response to an article about hydrogen injection and fraud at: http://www.svherald.com/articles/2009/06/22/news/doc4a3effda780cc863578436.txt

 

Answering the Skeptics and Scolding the Frauds

 

          Fraud as defined by Wikipedia is an intentional deception for personal gain or to damage another individual.  If a technology like the complete Hydrogen Boost system (hydrogen generator, fuel heater, electronic fuel mixture control circuit, Scangauge, permanent engine treatment, and increased tire pressure) can achieve a 15% increase in fuel mileage, and occasionally achieves 25%, without driving tips, and has consistently achieved over 50% with the use of the driving tips in our manual, then advertising 20% to 50% increase in mileage would not be fraud, especially when this is all explained in the first paragraph of our web site home page. 

 

          However when a company takes a poor copy of one single component of a good system like ours and exaggerates the advertising of the expected result of using it, then that would be intentional deception for personal gain.  There are so many HHO companies that jumped onto the bandwagon from 2006 to 2008, selling junk electrolyzers built from plans that were meant to be an experimenter’s guide, advertising these electrolyzers as a hydrogen injection system that can increase mileage by 40% and more, that the whole HHO injection industry is being scandalized.  

 

          Dateline NBC did a show on Dennis Lee’s HAFC “system” which claims a guaranteed 50% increase in mileage, exposing the fraud of not only the HAFC system, but of Dennis Lee’s history as well.  The Sierra Visa Herald article at http://www.svherald.com/articles/2009/06/22/news/doc4a3effda780cc863578436.txt  exposes the fraud of many dealers of Water4Gas e-books that exaggerated the effects of an experimenter’s guide of Ozzie Freedom (Eyal Siman-Tov), the man who profited most from the fraud even if it wasn’t him who perpetrated the bulk of it. 

 

           Popular Mechanic published an article (not in their paper magazine) at http://www.popularmechanics.com/automotive/how_to/4276846.html that explains why the junk put out by the frauds can’t work to achieve the exaggerated claims, but mentions Hydrogen Boost and how our system achieves its results.  CNN spend time with Hydrogen Boost in late summer 2008 after the fuel prices began to plummet and never did air the report, (my report is at http://www.hydrogen-boost.com/April%202009.html  ) maybe because of the 10% proven results we showed (with only part of the system) or because of the plummeting fuel prices. 

 

          I have seen many false positive results reported on in television news video posted on the Internet, that were achieved with bad testing protocol using various good and bad versions of the HHO technology.  These reports helped perpetrate the fraud in the industry.

 

          The Society for Automotive Engineers Technical Paper Series document number 2000-01-2206  states, “It is well known that hydrogen addition to spark-ignited (SI) engines can reduce exhaust emissions and increase efficiency.”

 

          We have just received university dynamometer tests on a 1.9 liter diesel car in Europe testing only the addition of hydrogen, made by our electrolyzer powered by the alternator, showing 3.5% decrease in specific fuel consumption measured in g/kWh.  We have similar results from the same dynamometer tests showing a decrease in fuel consumption with an increase in fuel temperature.  We have documented government agency and university and private laboratory test results showing increase in engine efficiency caused by the engine treatment included in many of our systems.  We also have documented private test results and undisputed agreement from all engineers that our recommended increase in tire pressure reduces fuel consumption.  Using all these components in a complete system allows us to achieve the 15% or more mileage increase we report on our web site.  Nobody could honestly accuse us of fraud after looking at all our documentation, not even CNN.

 

          Between the bad reporting, the bad testing, the exaggerated advertising, the poor copies of a good system, the plummeting fuel prices, and the failing economy, the HHO injection industry has slowed so much that most companies have gone out of business.  For the most part (the frauds) that is good.  But for the honest companies dedicated to a long history of customer satisfaction, like Hydrogen Boost, the future still holds the promise of reward for good honest hard work.

 

Conclusions:  Claiming 30%-40% mileage increase and getting 5% is fraud.

          Reporting less then 5% with hydrogen alone but 15-25% with a complete system that delivers results, and 50% or more with the inclusion of driving tips, is good business.  Hydrogen Boost has been doing good business for ten years.  Let’s hope that the industry we built can survive the bad press caused by the hundreds of frauds that profited at the expense of needy customers looking for the real technology.  Let’s hope that those in need of a good technology don’t give up looking because of the frauds.

 

          Here’s another article I ran across at:  http://www.engr.wisc.edu/alumni/perspective/35.3/article15greenmoped.html

Going green, one moped at a time

Vespa scooter

A Vespa scooter is a scooter with a history—it’s credited as the affordable form of mass transportation that reignited Italy’s post-World War II economy. The scooter’s unique, timeless design makes it the “Rolls Royce” of scooters, an heirloom that can last 20 years in the care of a faithful owner.

Yet, even for a Vespa, there’s room for improvement, and 16 UW-Madison engineering students spent fall 2008 figuring out how to make the already environmentally friendly Vespa even more green.

While enrolled in civil and environmental engineering professor Marc Anderson’s section of InterEngineering 160, Introduction to Engineering, the students designed, built and tested a hydrogen-based system that ultimately reduced the amount of gasoline necessary to run a Vespa moped by 10 percent. The system is based on electrolysis, the process of splitting water into oxygen and hydrogen via an electrical charge.

“As freshmen, they’re just starting to get used to things, and I usually pick out projects that are difficult so they’ll learn a lot,” says Anderson, adding the project offered exposure to mechanical, environmental, electrochemical, construction, and materials science engineering.

The students experimented on a yellow 50-cc steel-body Vespa moped provided at a substantial discount by Jeff Dunn, the owner of Vespa Madison at Dunn’s Import in Middleton. While the bike already averages 90 miles to a gallon of gasoline, Dunn says even Vespa needs to do better environmentally, and he’s more than willing to help the students.

“I think what they’re doing is very exciting. I believe wholeheartedly that it’s good for Vespa,” he says.

The students divided their work into three components: the electrolysis device, the battery and the engine. For the electrolysis device, they designed rectangular electrodes to split the water using carbon plates coated with a nanoparticle thin film Anderson developed. They set the plates inside a container called an electrolyzer, which they positioned near the moped engine beneath the driver’s seat. The electrodes are powered by a charge from the moped’s alternator and separate the water into oxygen and hydrogen, funneling the hydrogen directly to the engine’s cylinder via a stainless steel tube.

Once in the engine, the hydrogen produces a more complete combustion, according to Anderson, which means the engine more efficiently uses the fuel.

The electrolyzer system could, in addition to reducing the amount of gasoline necessary, also reduce moped emissions. While the students did not have time to test emissions levels their system produced, Anderson anticipates the more complete combustion caused by hydrogen in the engine would make the moped run cleaner. From here, the electrolyzer system may benefit the UW-Madison vehicle teams, which frequently experiment with hybrid vehicle technologies. In fact, Mechanical Engineering Faculty Associate Glenn Bower, who oversees the vehicle teams, offered additional advice and support to the moped project.

Not all college freshmen delve into their majors via practical, hands-on projects in their first semester on campus, and the experience has been valuable for mechanical engineering freshman Steven Burbach. “The project was very cutting-edge—we weren’t building things that had already been done, and I really appreciate Professor Anderson’s willingness to trust us with this,” he says. “Engineering isn’t just sitting at a desk. It’s getting out there, tackling real-world problems.”

 

 

 

 

Click here to ORDER NOW

Home    Specifications    Test Results    Technical Information    Newsletter    Order    Contact

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Home

 

Specifications    

 

Test Results

 

Technical Information

 

Testimonial Video

 

Demo Video

 

Newsletter    

 

Order    

 

Contact

 


Free counters provided by Honesty.com .

 

 

 

 

 

 

Help

Help

Help