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Dennis Lee, HAFC on Dateline NBC

 

          Just before leaving for a business trip I got a phone call notifying me of a television show about Dennis Lee and his HAFC (hydrogen assist fuel cell) system that is a poor “copy” of the Hydrogen Boost system.  The Dateline NBC show can be seen by clicking here.  The HAFC dealers claim that they will guarantee the system will increase the fuel mileage of your car by 50%, or your money back.  They also claim that their company Dutchman Enterprises is developing a PICC (pre-ignition catalytic converter) that should be able to achieve 100 miles per gallon on basically any vehicle, and that to get in line to receive a quote for the eventual PICC, you must purchase the HAFC.

I have restrained myself from commenting on the HAFC and PICC until now that Dateline has come out with the same comments I have been holding back, and now people are associating the failure of HAFC with other hydrogen assist systems that have come about since Hydrogen Boost began this industry nine years ago.  I have restrained my comments despite the report that one of our commercial installers had installed two of the HAFC systems and experienced zero improvements despite numerous “adjustments” and when he installed his first Hydrogen Boost system he immediately experienced a 15% increased in mileage as our customers typically do.  My comments to the HAFC were usually restrained to two words, “Dennis Lee.”  If asked to comment on the HAFC I would tell the enquirer to search Google or Yahoo for “Dennis Lee” and then read the history of his involvement with fraud. 

Now I feel compelled to make further comments, now that people are associating HAFC with Hydrogen Boost.  Though HAFC is a poor “copy” of Hydrogen Boost, though they will deny that it is a copy because it has a fuel additive, their system is poorly designed and inadequate to achieve what we do, much less the 50% to 100 mpg exaggerated claims they advertise. My comments should include statements like the following.  “I wish these fly-by-nights would quit ruining our legitimate industry with their exaggerated claims and history of fraud.”  “It should be obvious to any consumer that 50% increase in mileage is a difficult feat and will not be accomplished on modern vehicles without a change in driving habits.”  “Claiming 50% increase and getting little if any, does not fit into our business model of satisfying our customers with a truthful report of typical mileage gains of 15% or more.”  “The HAFC dealers have too many hoops to jump through before you can ask for your money back if you don’t see the promised mileage increase.”  “Our guarantee is for customer satisfaction.  Even if you get 50% increase in mileage, if you don’t like putting water in it, or for whatever reason, if you return the system within 30 days, we will refund the cost of everything except the wiring kit, engine treatment, and shipping, no questions asked.”  Actually we will refund those pieces too if they did not get used. 

One comment I would like to make about the Dateline show.  They called Dennis Lee the “inventor” of the HAFC system.  Though Dennis may technically meet the definition of “inventor” because his name may be on a patent application, I don’t consider anyone, including myself, the inventor of adding hydrogen to the intake air of an internal combustion engine to improve combustion, because there was a patent issued for that already in 1920.  Heating fuel to improve combustion has also been patented since the early 1900’s.  Changing the fuel ratio and ignition timing has been well known for decades to optimize combustion.  And adding acetone and/or xylene to the fuel has been well known for many years, though questionable in its effects.  In fact while I am at it I would like to complain about many of the fly-by-nights that have been on TV news casts over the last 3-5 years being referred to as “the inventor” of some copy-cat hydrogen assist system.  An inventor is someone who comes up with something new, and this technology has been around longer than most people have.

Now let me make some specific comments about the Dateline piece.  Does the HAFC “work,” and can we tell by the one test Dateline did with the Honda Accord they say they bought just for this test?  Well, that would depend on the definition you have for “work.”  Does any piece of the HAFC system actually improve mileage?  Or can the HAFC system improve mileage by 50% on any vehicle?  The answer to the first question must be “yes” and the answer to the second question must be “maybe?”  Let me explain.

Dateline reported that the EPA qualified testing facility tested the system and got exactly (they may have said basically) the same mileage with and without the system.  If they got they exact same mileage, then some part of that system must have given a benefit, because the energy used to generate the hydrogen was more than the energy returned by the combustion of that hydrogen because the hydrogen generator was not 100% efficient.  So there was an energy loss in the process of generating the hydrogen and that energy loss must have been compensated for by the benefit of some portion of the system.  Maybe the combustion enhancement qualities of the hydrogen, maybe the fuel additive, maybe the fuel magnets built into their “fuel warmer”, maybe the oil additive.  Conformation of this fact is the reported better mileage after the hydrogen generator was shut off, reported to be around 3%.  So some component of the system improved mileage.

The answer to the second question above, in my book, must be maybe.  Can a system increase mileage by 50% just with the equipment and without changing driving techniques.  Maybe.  Unlikely, but without testing every single vehicle out there, I could not say that it was impossible.  But I could say I guarantee that it can’t happen, or I’ll give you $1000.  I can say that only because I have $1000 and the guarantee is not a “guarantee” that it will happen, its just a guarantee that I will give you $1000 if it doesn’t happen.  And I think I would be quite safe to make the bet that they won’t increase mileage by 50% on any vehicle. 

But Dateline cannot say the system doesn’t work, just because they tested it on one vehicle.  However, they could have said, “The odds against the HAFC increasing mileage by 50% on some vehicle out there is about a zillion to one,” even though a zillion is not really a number.

 

What about Hydrogen Boost?  Why haven’t we been on the news?

 

          Maybe it’s because our system works as we say it does.  We don’t exaggerate the mileage improvements achieved by our customers, and we honor our money back guarantee.  Have we been visited by news agencies?  Yes.  In fact the video on the top of our home page was produced by Max World News but never made it on the air.  We have also spent a few days with CNN in the late summer of 2008 and that piece never made it on the air.  Whether that was because the price of gas fell off so much that it was no longer a news story, or whether it was because CNN would not air a piece on a device that actually worked, who knows?  What I can tell you is that CNN tested our system on their own vehicle and the test showed a 25% increase in mileage, which I immediately told them must be wrong, because we normally only expected a 10% increase with the equipment we were testing on their vehicle.  After closer examination of the protocol used for the test we found the source of the error and immediately reported to the CNN news crew why the real increase was only 10%, not the 25% they thought they saw, explaining the proper calculations.  The piece never made it to the television and we never got any of the video footage we could use to edit into a video.  We do however have the following pictures of our system installed on their vehicle, the news equipment in the back of their vehicle, and the great sunburst in the sky, taken just before the road test was performed.

 

 

 

 

          The point of this article is to emphasize that real savings in the range of 15%-25% are possible with a good Hydrogen Boost system, and that exaggerated claims made by many fly-by-night wanna-bees are only hurting our efforts to distribute a good system that saves fuel and improves emissions.  We agree with Dateline that the HAFC will not deliver what is promised by its dealers.  However we would like it known that there are good systems installed on vehicles that do indeed improve mileage by a modest amount. 

 

Customer Comment:  The following is an email exchange I had with one of our satisfied customers who read the above newsletter and reviewed the Dateline Newscast:

 

Hi Fran,

 

I was on your website yesterday and saw the video clip of Dateline NBC concerning Dennis Lee's HAFC.  When Hanson asked one of their "experts" how many of these hydrogen systems that he has seen actually worked, and he said "none", I was disappointed, but not surprised.  The networks seem to have their own agenda when it comes to just about anything.  Well, yesterday, in preparation of an upcoming emissions inspection, I disabled my Hydrogen Boost system, restoring everything to factory original.  I cleared the codes out and ran it for a few miles.  Scangauge says the vehicle is operating closed loop, and the CE light has remained off.  This morning, as I do every morning on my drive to work, I check my trip average mileage at established checkpoints along my route.  The Scangauge is reset when I get on the interstate, have reached 55 mph, and the cruise control is engaged.  My second from last checkpoint is about 15 miles from the point of reset.  It is at the lowest elevation of the trip before I have to go over a large hill.  The mileage at this point is the highest, and consistently, with the Hydrogen Boost, I have gotten anywhere between 40 and 46 miles per gallon, depending on weather and road conditions.  This morning, with the Hydrogen Boost off line, my mileage at this point was only 34 mpg's.  What more proof does anyone need?

 

 

All the Best,

 

George Sills

 

 

George,

 

            I guess as far as Hanson is concerned our system doesn’t “work” because it didn’t give you 50% increase in mileage, which would have required 51 mile per gallon.  But if his definition of “work” was to deliver the 15% I say is typical with vehicles we have tested on, then he would have to admit that it does “work,” since you got more than 39 miles per gallon (a 15% improvement).  You see, it all depends on what the meaning or “works” is.  For Dennis Lee it would have to mean 50% mileage increase, because that is what he “guarantees.”  Since I only report a typical 15% mileage increase, that should mean that my system “works.”  But you won’t get Hanson to say that. 

 

Affected by the false claims of others,

 

Fran

 

P.S. Thanks for your support.

 

 

 

 

 

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